The Legacy of a Legend…Farewell, Mr. Palmer

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image courtesy of arniesarmy.org

Recently, golf legend, Arnold Palmer passed away. We’re all aware of the legacy of golf achievements the man left. Over 9o championships, in addition to 18 wins in foreign championships and 12 wins on the senior tour he was not only a force on the golf course, but in the community of cancer research and treatment.

This is a less well-known part of Arnold’s history, as he was more concerned with moving the cause forward than personal notority. At age 67 in 1997, Arnold had a PSA screening test for prostate cancer. His PSA had been rising for 2-3 years and had resulted in 2 prior normal prostate biopsies. But this time, his third biopsy showed him to have prostate cancer. He went to Mayo clinic where the doctors discussed the treatment options. Wanting the highest chance for cure, Arnold opted for surgery to remove his prostate. The findings showed enough risk for possible recurrence that he then received 7 weeks of radiation therapy. Remarkably, only 6 weeks later, after physical therapy, Arnold was back on the golf course competing in tournaments.

He won the admiration of his fans (known as Arnie’s Army) and all Americans by becoming a lifelong spokesperson for prostate cancer control. He advocated prostate cancer screening with PSA. Regarding screening, and in keeping with current recommendations, he felt that men’s lives would be better if they just talked to their doctor about it. “That’s health and living”, he said, and felt that being healthy is the “good life”.

Arnold also formed the Arnold Palmer Prostate Center in Palm Springs at the Eisenhower Lucy Curie Cancer Center, and then supported the Arnold Palmer Pavilion at U. Pittsburgh Medical Center and Latrobe Area Hospital. Because of his advocacy, many more men have been cured of prostate cancer and are survivors.

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Funny Man Ben Stiller: Prostate cancer test ‘saved my life’

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Actor Ben Stiller revealed on Tuesday he was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2014. The tumor was surgically removed three months later, in September 2014, and Stiller has been cancer-free since.

Stiller shared the news on Howard Stern’s Sirius XM radio show, and in an essay posted online.

According to Stiller, it was the prostate-specific antigen test, a blood test known as the PSA, that saved his life. He was tested and treated in his 40s.

To Read More at Cnn.com Click Here!   Be sure to check out the infographics below to see what risk factors affect you!

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Orlando Sentinel features Dr. Patel & The Real Reason for PSA Screening

Being advocates for awareness & knowledge, the International Prostate Cancer Foundation shares with you opposing opinions in the fight against cancer with the belief that as individuals we have the right to be fully informed.

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Just recently, FOX 35 covered the lead story in the Orlando Sentinel highlighting the new “truths” behind various cancer-screening tests including those for breast, prostate, colon, lung and cervical cancer. While we at the IPCF are strong proponents of screening, a growing body of counterintuitive evidence is emerging and we encourage you to be aware of both sides as you define your own stance. As the debate develops some argue that certain cancers, regardless of screening & detection, are cancers that men and women die with, not of.

Our founder, Dr. Vipul Patel has expressed “… what is lost in the debate is that we’re taking away a man’s right to know…”.

Apart from whether screening & detection offer an indisputable road to a cure, ask yourself the value you place on simply having – clear knowledge & control of your health and options.

Read the full Orlando Sentinel article and form your own opinion!